Category Archives: Uncategorized

Distribution, Host-Seeking Phenology, and Host and Habitat Associations of Haemaphysalis longicornis Ticks, Staten Island, New York, USA

 Haemaphysalis longicornis, an invasive Ixodid tick, was recently reported in the eastern United States. The emergence of these ticks represents a potential threat for livestock, wildlife, and human health. We describe the distribution, host-seeking phenology, and host and habitat associations of these ticks on Staten Island, New York, a borough of New York City.

See full article: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/4/18-1541_article

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Tick-borne disease is multiple microbial in nature

A study recently published in Scientific Reports discovered that 65% of Lyme disease patients irrespective of their disease stage respond to several microbes. As a consequence, the authors have demonstrated that microbial infections in individuals suffering from Lyme disease do not follow the “one microbe, one disease” status-quo. Moreover, the probability that Lyme disease patients would respond to multiple microbes associated with the tick-borne disease is an astounding 85 %.

Article: https://www.news-medical.net/news/20181101/Tick-borne-disease-is-multiple-microbial-in-nature.aspx

Paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-34393-9?fbclid=IwAR3k-zPy2rJu8OuFl3HHqJ0twLPJvQrxiIUALUs0T-BuuJ50_1VQVwcflIQ 

Tick Study – Blacklegged Ticks Larvae and Nymphs’ Habitat is a Mystery in the Southern U.S.

In the southern U.S., blacklegged tick larvae and nymphs can be found on hosts, but they don’t otherwise show up in vegetation or—as a new study finds—in leaf litter or soil either. Learn more about how researchers at Texas A&M University dug up leaf litter and soil samples hoping to uncover the life history of larval and nymphal blacklegged ticks:

Entomology Today –

https://entomologytoday.org/2018/10/01/southern-united-states-young-blacklegged-ticks-habitat-mystery-ixodes-scapularis-lyme-disease/

Journal of Medical Entomology –

https://academic.oup.com/jme/advance-article/doi/10.1093/jme/tjy157/5090773

 

TickEncounter Uses Crowd Sourced Information to Learn About Asian Longhorned Ticks

Tom Mather’s blog provides evidence for using the “Power of the Crowd” and ground proofing certain findings. Tom’s most recent write up about a trip to Staten Island in search of the Asian longhorned tick is a must read: https://tickencounter.org/tick_notes/three_surprising_things

The articles three surprising findings are:

  1. Longicornus larvae hang out together on the tips of grasses, but like a bomb, they explode when something brushes by.
  2. Without magnification, nymphal Asian longhorned ticks look very similar to nymphal Lone Star ticks.
  3. Asian longhorned ticks are way more established than Tom expected to find.

 

 

Schumer Says Amendment Would Increase Funding To Fight Lyme Disease

An amendment that passed in the Senate would increase Lyme disease funding from fiscal year 2018’s level of $10.7 million to $12 million for fiscal year 2019. The amendment, made by U.S. Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, would become a part of the Health and Human Services Appropriations bill.

Read more about the amendment here: http://www.wamc.org/post/schumer-says-amendment-would-increase-funding-fight-lyme-disease